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Hermann Glassl, Munich: master violin from the 1920s
Hermann Glassl, Munich: master violin from the 1920s
Provenance: München
Maker: Hermann Glassl
Length of back: 35.3 cm
Year: 1924-1925
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Hermann Glassl, Munich: master violin from the 1920s

A collection of rare instruments brought forth this master violin in nearly-new condition, and it truly is an exceptional rarity in flawless condition. It was crafted in 1924/25 by Hermann Glassl, who came from a family of luthiers in the Vogtland region of Bohemia (now the Czech Republic). He learned his trade from his uncle Andreas Glässl, a former employee of the renowned Hamburg master Georg Winterling. During Hermann's long years of wandering, he perfected his skills whilst working at several different German workshops and refining his art under the highly esteemed luthier and influential teacher Johann Emil Züst in Zurich, Pierre Vrint in London and Anton Wittmann in Vienna. In 1912 he settled down in Munich and quickly established a good name for himself as a knowledgeable restorer, although his new instruments were strict interpretations of classic standards which won over several demanding musicians of the era. With its delicate elegance, this violin provides a unique glance at Munich's music scene in the 1920s. Its refined purfling, the blackened margins of the scroll and the narrow flames of the premium maple used for the two-piece back define the striking but tastefully balanced appearance of this outstanding master instrument. A thick coat of luminous orange oil varnish against a golden background completes the aesthetic. Numerous brand marks on the inside and outside of the body confirm the violin's provenance, as does Glassl's original label; apparently the violin was never played in all of its ninety years. With a back length of 35.3 cm, it is recommended as a comfortable choice for violinists who want a smaller instrument that has an uncompromisingly good sound full of brightness and brilliance. After having been meticulously set up at our workshop, it is now ready to play.

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