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corilon violins

The Baroque bow (The violin bow, part I)


The Baroque violin bow as part of a musical revolution: violin making, music and bow making in the 17th and 18th century.


The development of the Baroque violin bow is a story of attempts and errors, an interplay of craftsmanship and music during the course of which widely varied models were designed, modified and improved. When the baroque violin was invented in the late 16th century, the art of creating stringed instruments reached a zenith that triggered a musical revolution. The violin's predecessors were predominantly used to keep time on the dance floors of weddings and festivals, but this newer form of the instrument quickly liberated itself from its disdained origins. At first, however, the early masters of violin making paid no thought to the issue of a proper bow, so people continued to play using the fiddle and rebec bows of the late middle ages. Many of these bows were very clearly designed as rhythm instruments. Some of them were only 20 to 30 cm (8-12 inches) and had a strong convex curve; their length was further restricted by the player using an underhand or closed-fist grip.

Baroque violin bow, Motek Leeuwarden, circa 1995 - frog

Baroque violin bow, Motek Leeuwarden

Provenance: Altea
Maker: Motek Leeuwarden
Weight: 56.2 g
Year: approx. 1995

At first, French Baroque music in particular stayed close to the styles in the canon of dance music, so it had little reason to re-examine how the bow was used and constructed. In Italy, however, there was vivid interest in cantabile playing. People there preferred the overhand grip, which opened doors to new sounds and ways of playing the violin: the “Italian” grip (as opposed to the “French” underhand grip) allowed the player to bow with greater sensitivity and modify the sound. Legato and spiccato techniques became more widespread as music grew more soloistic in nature, and longer violin bows meant that longer tones and sequences were now possible. By composing pieces which relied on the long Baroque violin bow, Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713) made fundamental changes to the character of the violin; its aural ideal came to resemble that of singing more and more. The introduction of a longer violin bow triggered a series of changes in construction, especially an increase in the height of the head so as to achieve a more even distribution of weight and playability along the full length of the bow. Baroque bows with less of an arch gradually became more popular until eventually the straight to slightly concave line evolved. Players once determined the pressure of the bow by modifying their grip, e.g. by applying pressure with the thumb, but over time, the detachable frog and "toothpick"-style bows made a greater variety in tension possible, until at last the frog with an eyelet and screw established itself as the standard. These technical improvements were accompanied by more sophistication in the aesthetic design of the Baroque violin bow. Premium woods, especially the very hard amourette, were processed with great artistry, sticks were fluted, and frogs and heads were shaped into fanciful designs and decorated. No uniform standards emerged on a widespread scale, i.e. in this context one cannot speak of there being a typical model of a Baroque violin bow. What is, however, typical of Baroque-period bows is the diversity of shapes and designs.



Related articles:

Overview: “The violin bow”

The Classical bow (The violin bow, part II)

F. X. Tourte, founding father of the modern violin bow (The violin bow, part III)

The Baroque violin - more than catgut strings

John Dodd: a legend of oyster shells and silver spoons

J & A Beare (Beare's), London: expertise in changing times

New arrivals in our catalogue:
  • Antique Mittenwald violin from the Mittenwald violin-making school, 1919
  • Interesting master violin from Bohemia, approx. 1880
  • Powerful German violin bow by H.R. Pfretzschner
  • Older English violin, J. R. Dutton 1979
  • Fine master violin by Marcus Klimke, contemporary elite violin maker (certificate Markus Klimke)
  • Excellent French violin bow, Morizot Frères (certificate J.F. Raffin)
  • Fine Italian violin by Mario Gadda, approx. 1960 (certificate Mario Gadda)
  • Fine French master violin, Victor Aubry, Paris 1944
  • WORKED OVER AND TONALLY OPTIMIZED: Ernst Heinrich Roth, fine 1955 violin - Guarnerius model
  • Antique German Saxon violin with a bright, warm tone
  • Antique French 3/4 cello by J.T.L., approx. 1880
  • Fine master violin bow by Hermann Richard Pfretzschner
  • Good German violin bow, W. E. Dörfler
  • Fine French violin bow by E. Sartory (certificate J.F. Raffin)
  • Fine English violin bow by Frank Napier / W.E. Hill & Sons (certificate Hieronymus Köstler)
  • Mario Gadda, Italian violin after Oreste Candi, 1984 (certificate Mario Gadda)
  • Mario Gadda workshop, Italian violin after Stefano Scarampella
  • Old, 1940's Saxon violin, Markneukirchen, bright warm tones
  • Powerful older silver-mounted violin bow, Germany, by Klaus Ringer
  • Modern violin made in the French style, probably Czech or Hungarian
  • Antique Markneukirchen violin, by Schuster & Co. approx. 1900/1910
  • Antique German violin from Saxony, approx. 1920
  • Old, silver mounted violin bow, after Lupot - noble, classy tone
  • Lothar Seifert, German master violin bow, silver