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Noteworthy families of Markneukirchen violin makers

Corilon violins · Lilienstrasse 2 · D-81669 Munich
Phone: +49 (0)89-444 19 619 · Fax: +49 (0)89-444 19 620 ·

Introducing some noteworthy families of Markneukirchen violin makers: Heberlein, Hamm and Roth

Vogtland violin making is not to be equated with the large number of cheap instruments that were sold throughout the world in the 18th and 19th centuries. Markneukirchen was the home of – and the venue for training – several international violin makers and violin-making masters who worked in such places as the U.S., Russia and numerous major European cities. Many of those who remained in the Vogtland region, however, also shared the same high standards of quality and solid innovation.

One of the most prominent families of violin makers in Markneukirchen was the Heberleins, who created a strong international name for themselves. Their most famous member is Heinrich Theodor Heberlein jr. (1843-1910), who was renowned for the excellent quality of his instruments and was awarded multiple honours, including Knight of the Saxonian Albrecht Order. Johann Gottlob Heberlein (1782-1856) was a good violinist and a craftsman who enjoyed experimentation. In 1813 he joined forces with a manufacturer of brass instruments to make a brass violin – an interesting, “interdisciplinary” chapter in the history of Markneukirchen instruments!

Heinrich Paul Theodor Heberlein, master violin 1962 - top

Violin, Heinrich Theodor Heberlein Jr.

Inventory No.: 2928
Provenance: Markneukirchen
Maker: Heinrich Paul Theodor Heberlein
Length of back: 35,7
Year: 1962

Johann Gottfried Hamm, master violin from the Vogtland region, c. 1780

Johann Gottfried Hamm, violin, c. 1780

Inventory No.: 3245
Provenance: Markneukirchen
Maker: Johann G. Hamm
Length of back: 35.6
Year: approx. 1780

Johann Gottfried Hamm (1744-1817) was also part of a large family of Markneukirchen violin makers and was one of the few who was successful with his fake Italian labels. Indeed, his meticulous work, especially his pieces which featured partial inlays with ivory trim, was often incorrectly attributed to Italian schools. The name of the family Roth stands for producing industrial and yet quality-conscious Markneukirchen violins.

Gustav Robert Roth (b. 1852) learned his trade in the famous Leipzig studio of Ludwig Christian August Bausch. In 1873 he founded a factory of stringed instruments and jointly managed it with his son Ernst Heinrich Roth (1877-1948) from 1900 onward. Ernst Heinrich was an outstanding violin maker who perfected his art during his extensive travels through Europe. Another member of the family, violin maker Otto Roth, created a truly unique piece for the opera orchestra in Chicago: a huge bass violin with a body measuring 2.10 m and an overall height of 4.20 m. The Roth company is still operating, and further information about the history of the Roth family can be found on the its website.

Related articles:

The bow makers of Markneukirchen

Klingenthal: the origin of violin making

On the history of violin making in western Bohemia

Ernst Heinrich Roth: a rediscovered master

Markneukirchen bow maker HR Pfretzschner

Hopf: a dynasty of Vogtland violin makers

Silent electric violins - a guide to technical standards and quality characteristics

Mittenwald violin makers - contemporary masters keeping their tradition alive with their vibrant craftsmanship

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Corilon violins · Lilienstrasse 2 · D-81669 Munich
Phone: +49 (0)89-444 19 619 · Fax: +49 (0)89-444 19 620 ·

New arrivals in our catalogue:
  • Mittenwald violin, Johann Reiter, 1923, opus 42
  • Didier Nicolas (L‘Ainé), master violin, circa 1825
  • 3/4 - excellent 3/4 violin, Mittenwald, approx. 1850
  • Edwin Lothar Herrmann, German violin bow
  • Fine violin bow, probably Albert Nürnberger
  • Fine Markneukirchen violin: copy of Santo Serafino (Sanctus Seraphin)
  • Excellent French violin, Collin-Mézin (fils), No. 54
  • Central Italian violin by Aristide Benigni, Ascoli Piceno (published twice)
  • Italian violin, Archimede Orlandini, Parma 1985 (published)
  • 3/4 –sized German violin by Boosey & Hawkes
  • Markneukirchen violin, "Künstler-Violine Nr. 18" by Meinel & Herold
  • Claudio Gamberini, a fine Italian violin, 1930, Bologna
  • Excellent violin from Machold’s custom violin workshop, Chemnitz
  • Italian violin by Lodovico Giovannetti, 1955 (certificate Castelli)
  • Silver mounted violin bow by Rudolf Neudörfer
  • Antique French violin, Mirecourt
  • 1982 Bubenreuth violin, by Erich Werner master violin maker
  • Good Markneukirchen violin bow, approx. 1930
  • F. & R. Enders, outstanding Markneukirchen violin bow
  • Powerful silver mounted violin bow, Markneukirchen
  • English violin bow after Tourte, silver mounted
  • François Fent, a fine historic viola of the late 18th century
  • Fine French violin bow, L. Morizot (certificate J.F. Raffin)
  • Rare antique violin with a gentleman's head